THE SPACE EDUCATORS' HANDBOOK

SPACE VIDEO:THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD

KEN FILMS INC., Brooklyn, N.Y.
Click here to see a large picture of the THING.


DISCUSSION

What appeared, in the movie THE THING, as wholly impossible three decades ago, still seems doubtful but not altogether unthinkable. The setting of the movie is a frigid North Pole military research station. The research staff discovers a "thing-like" being encased beneath the ice in a frozen state. After extracting the Thing by sawing the ice into a casket-like form, the Thing's ice casket melts and flesh thaws bringing the Thing back to life. The process suggests the possibility of cryonics. (Cryonics is the science of dropping the temperature of biological entities such as human organs [or biological species] in order to preserve them for extended periods of time eliminating or slowing the aging process such that when returned to normal temperature, the entity regains vitality as though the process had not been performed.) If cryonics can be achieved by spacefarers, a journey to the stars may be realized. Though the trip might require centuries, those who set forth can be frozen into a suspended biological state then resurrected (thawed) on arrival in the same fashion depicted in the movie THE THING.


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Last modified: Wednesday, 30-Nov-04 09:15:00 PM CDT

Author: Jerry Woodfill / NASA, Mail Code ER7, jared.woodfill1@jsc.nasa.gov

Curator: Cecilia Breigh, NASA JSC ER7

Responsible Official: Andre Sylvester, NASA JSC ER7

Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division, Walter W. Guy, Chief.

Picture of the logo of NASA Johnson Space Center's Automation, Robotics, and 
Simulation Division.  The logo depicts a robot extended arm and hand.  The robotic 
hand holds Mars in its grasp.