GALLERY OF SPACE FICTION BOOKS FOR OLDER READERS

SKYFALL(circa 1978)

SKYFALL BOOK  COVER

SKYFALL by Harry Harrison, Copyright 1978 by Harry Harrison, Published by ACE BOOKS


DISCUSSION

SKYFALL deals with the threat of a nuclear satellite's malfunction causing damage and loss of life to Earth's inhabitants. Such a scenario appeared as a threat in 1979 with the descent of Skylab. Though nuclear impact was not the case with Skylab, the mass which could descend on a populated area caused concern to the world's population. There was much relief when the makeshift American space station (modified Apollo hardware) fell harmlessly into the Indian Ocean with a few of the larger pieces reaching a thinly populated area near Perth, Australia.

The cover artwork of SKYFALL is a magnificent rendering of a Soviet rocket cluster. Rather than wait for the development of an enormous rocket engine like the American F-1 (1,500,000 pounds of thrust), the Soviets expertly clustered smaller thrust systems to quickly achieve the lifting power necessary to loft a man into orbit. An example of Soviet rocket technology can be viewed by clicking here.


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Last modified: Wednesday, 30-Nov-04 09:15:00 PM CDT

Author: Jerry Woodfill / NASA, Mail Code ER7, jared.woodfill1@jsc.nasa.gov

Curator: Cecilia Breigh, NASA JSC ER7

Responsible Official: Andre Sylvester, NASA JSC ER7

Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division, Walter W. Guy, Chief.

Picture of the logo of NASA Johnson Space Center's Automation, Robotics, and 
Simulation Division.  The logo depicts a robot extended arm and hand.  The robotic 
hand holds Mars in its grasp.