THE SPACE EDUCATORS' HANDBOOK

GALLERY OF POPULAR MECHANICS SPACE COVERS

POPULAR MECHANICS MARCH 1956

POPULAR MECHANICS MARCH 1956 Cover

Copyright 1956 by Popular Mechanics Company


DISCUSSION

The above issue of POPULAR MECHANICS featured a story about a high altitude parachute jump. The chilling words of the article began: "Can a man fall out of the sky and live to tell about it? Will he freeze to death on the way to earth? Or will aerodynamic heating literally cook him? Will his space suit provide the squeeze he needs to stay alive in air where the pressure is less than one pound per square inch? Falling freely, will he spin so fast his heart will go dry? Will his chute rip to pieces when it opens at low altitude?

When NASA's program to put men in space initiated, these same questions remained with regard to protecting astronauts and spacecraft from the harsh environment of outer space. Through a gradual test-prone sequence of flights and unmanned tests, answers to every question were forthcoming.


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Last modified: Wednesday, 30-Nov-04 09:15:00 PM CDT

Author: Jerry Woodfill / NASA, Mail Code ER7, jared.woodfill1@jsc.nasa.gov

Curator: Cecilia Breigh, NASA JSC ER7

Responsible Official: Andre Sylvester, NASA JSC ER7

Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division, Walter W. Guy, Chief.

Picture of the logo of NASA Johnson Space Center's Automation, Robotics, and 
Simulation Division.  The logo depicts a robot extended arm and hand.  The robotic 
hand holds Mars in its grasp.