THE SPACE EDUCATORS' HANDBOOK

GALLERY OF POPULAR MECHANICS SPACE COVERS

EVERYDAY MECHANICS NOVEMBER 1930

EVERYDAY MECHANICS COVER NOVEMBER 1930

Copyright, 1930 by Everyday Mechanics Publications, Inc.


DISCUSSION

The publication EVERYDAY MECHANICS was a forerunner of POPULAR MECHANICS. Published by the "Father of the Pulp", Hugo Gernsback, the magazine popularized science and technology products and themes. The theme of space travel was a favorite topic of Gernsback. Though a spaceship was certainly not an "everyday mechanics" technology ( better suited to science fiction), Gernsback chose to feature a spaceship in the November 1930 issue of EVERYDAY MECHANICS. Even the terminology is unique to the era of the 1930s. Gernsback called "launch" the "start." His comment was, "The most difficult part of a spaceflight is "the start." The cover artwork depicts Gernsback's thinking with regard to a spaceship. To provide for the acceleration added "g-forces" of "the start," couches are "spring-equipped hammocks to break the shock." In Apollo-like splashdown fashion, Gernsback notes, "At the top (of the cover sketch) you see the parachute used to 'ease down' the spaceflier in the atmosphere."


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Last modified: Wednesday, 30-Nov-04 09:15:00 PM CDT

Author: Jerry Woodfill / NASA, Mail Code ER7, jared.woodfill1@jsc.nasa.gov

Curator: Cecilia Breigh, NASA JSC ER7

Responsible Official: Andre Sylvester, NASA JSC ER7

Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division, Walter W. Guy, Chief.

Picture of the logo of NASA Johnson Space Center's Automation, Robotics, and 
Simulation Division.  The logo depicts a robot extended arm and hand.  The robotic 
hand holds Mars in its grasp.