CLICK ON THE MONTH OF INTEREST

JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC


NOVEMBER 11

* First deployment of commercial satellites (2) by Shuttle on STS-5. Crew displayed sign at left during mission (1982).

* First photo of Earth's curvature made from balloon, Explorer 2, (over South Dakota) at an altitude of 72,000 ft., which was an altitude record (1935).

Click here to return to the calendar page.


NOVEMBER 12

* Voyager 1 imaged Saturn's ring system and planet from less than 80,000 miles (1980).

* The American Interplanetary Society built their first liquid propellant rocket and performed a static test which lasted more than 20 seconds at 60 lb of thrust (1932).

Click here to return to the calendar page.


NOVEMBER 13

* HEAO-2 launched (1978). The High Energy Astronomical Observatory mapped all X-ray sources and discovered the most distant and brightest quasar.

* The "Group for the Study of Reaction Propulsion" was founded in Leningrad in the Soviet Union (1931).

Click here to return to the calendar page.


NOVEMBER 14

* Naval aviation began with flight of a Curtiss biplane, piloted by Eugene Ely, from wooden runway built above the forward deck of the U.S. S. Birmingham cruiser (1910).

* Apollo 12 hit by lightning on launch (1969).

Click here to return to the calendar page.


NOVEMBER 15

* Soviets launched their version of the Space Shuttle called Buran. The Buran (unlike the U.S. Shuttle) has no main engines. Buran depends only on the Energiya booster to lift it into orbit. (1989)

* William Herschel born (1738).

Click here to return to the calendar page.


NOVEMBER 16

* Last crew visited the Skylab (1973).

Click here to return to the calendar page.


NOVEMBER 17

* Surveyor 6 flew 8 feet above the Moon, which was the first liftoff from the surface of the Moon (1967).

(Click on Surveyor for more information.)

* First commercial rocket launched (1988).

Click here to return to the calendar page.


NOVEMBER 18

* Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) launched (1989).

( From "Spinoff 1991," NASA, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1991, p. 16.)

Launched on November 18, 1991, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) is studying the origin and dynamics of the universe and seeking evidence to support the Big Bang theory that the universe began with a cataclysmic explosion.

Operating in a polar orbit 560 miles high, COBE is mapping the diffuse infrared radiation, called the cosmic background, that bombards Earth from every direction; determining the detailed spectrum of the background radiation; and searching for the earliest formed galaxies. COBE data has enabled astronomers to create the first map of the distribution of nitrogen throughout the Milky Way galaxy. COBE's all-sky nitrogen survey, along with additional maps of carbon and dust distributions, provides information that may help scientists understand better the heating and cooling processes that take place in the universe. It is expected that COBE data will help clarify such matters as the nature of the primeval explosion believed to have created the universe, and the processes leading to the formation of galaxies. Goddard Space Flight Center is COBE project manager.

Click here to return to the calendar page.


NOVEMBER 19

* Apollo 12 landed on the Moon (1969). (Click on "Apollo 12" for eye-witness accounts of what walking and exploring on the Moon was like for the astronauts of Apollo 12 and Apollo 14.)

Click here to return to the calendar page.


NOVEMBER 20

* First time a plane exceeds 1,300 mph. The pilot was Scott Crossfield (1953).

* Otto von Guericke, the inventor of nothing (a vacuum), born (1602).

Click here to return to the calendar page.


NOVEMBER 21


Return to the top of this page


Click here to return to the SPACE EDUCATORS' HANDBOOK HOME PAGE.


Notices: What You Need to Know About NASA JSC Web Policies

Last modified: Tuesday, 15-Feb-00 11:00:00 AM CDT

Author: Jerry Woodfill / NASA, Mail Code ER7, jared.woodfill1@jsc.nasa.gov

Curator: Cecilia Breigh, NASA JSC ER

Responsible Official: Andre Sylvester, NASA JSC ER7

Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division, Walter W. Guy, Chief.

ARSD logo.