WALT DISNEY SPACE COMIC BOOK GALLERY

GOOFY SPACE COMIC BOOK COVER

Copyright The Walt Disney Company, WALT DISNEY'S GOOFY ADVENTURES No. 5 October 1990. W.D. Publications, Inc. Publisher.


DISCUSSION

Though most comic and cartoon artists generally present accurate science in their works, obvious scientific "anomalies" are introduced into the artwork for the purpose of entertainment. For example, the above cover of the Walt Disney characters Goofy and Mickey Mouse depicts a lunar landing scene with obvious technical anomalies. Among these are a cloudless Earth with the terminator drawn vertically rather than horizonally. If the Sun's illumination causes the Earth's terminator to be vertical with respect to the Moon scene, then the shadow of Goofy's spaceship would not fall on the cartoon characters.

Analysis of space comic book covers and stories make a useful learning experience for students of science and space technology. Goofy's ship is a single stage to orbit (SSTO) design. Such vehicles are not yet possible with today's fuels and technology. What is required to create such a space vehicle is an interesting study which the story "First Goof on the Moon" might be used to introduce in the classroom.

The following Disney space comic covers offer a rich collection of science feasibility studies.


UNCLE SCROOGE : THE LOONY LUNAR GOLD RUSH

MARS AND BEYOND : A Science Feature From TOMORROWLAND (circa 1957)

MAN IN SPACE SATELLITES


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Author: Jerry Woodfill / NASA, Mail Code ER7, jared.woodfill1@jsc.nasa.gov

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ARSD logo of a robotic hand holding up a planet, perhaps Mars, 
in space