ADVANCED SPACE EXPLORATION PROGRAM ART


THE JOURNEY (145K)

by Pat Rawlings

Description: The painting below called THE JOURNEY has the theme of exploration and settlement of the solar system which starts in Earth orbit from a space station, continues on the Moon, and finally reaches Mars.

Click here to see a large picture of THE JOURNEY by Pat Rawlings."


OBERTH ASCENDING (119K)

by Pat Rawlings

Description: The painting called OBERTH ASCENDING depicts a reusable Lunar Lander called OBERTH leaving a lunar outpost (base). Because the base is not at first self-sufficient, the lander must perform routine flights to resupply the outpost.

Click here to see a large picture of OBERTH ASCENDING by Pat Rawlings."


EXPLORATION EXPRESS (136K)

by Pat Rawlings

Description: The picture shows a rocket inserting a Mars transfer vehicle into orbit. The postulated rocket is a nuclear thermal type which would be able to shorten the transit time from Earth to Mars as well as lower the mass boosted from Earth. The rocket's reactor would be inert until ignited in deep space for thrust of its payload to Mars.

Click here to see a large picture of EXPLORATION EXPRESS by Pat Rawlings."


FIRST LIGHT (102K)

by Pat Rawlings

Description: The painting is of Mars astronauts exploring the Noctis Labyrinthus canyon of Mars. The setting is just after sunrise when an early morning fog might hide the bottom of the canyon nested miles below the explorers' elevation. The exploration of geological and meteorological features of Mars has the potential of improving understanding of Earth.

Click here to see a large picture of FIRST LIGHT by Pat Rawlings."


FIELD TRIP (187K)

by Pat Rawlings

Description: The painting is of members of a lunar expedition planning their next investigation site from a lunar roving lab. Within the lunar vehicle is scientific analysis equipment for evaluating lunar samples at the site.

Click here to see a large picture of FIELD TRIP by Pat Rawlings."


THE HUMAN TOUCH (196K)

by Pat Rawlings

Description: Two Mars astronauts repair the Mars sample return rover's wheel motors. By refurbishing the machine, added hours of teleoperated performance would be available to Mars researchers.

Click here to see a large picture of THE HUMAN TOUCH by Pat Rawlings."


SHIFT CHANGE (162K)

by Pat Rawlings

Description: The trip home from Mars features a two-stage lander concept which is shown here soaring through the atmosphere of Mars after completing a year's stay on the planet's surface. The base shown is near the planet's equator and a tributary of Valles Marineris which is in the region of the Viking I landing site.

Click here to see a large picture of SHIFT CHANGE by Pat Rawlings."


RECONNOITER (111K)

by Pat Rawlings

Description: A robotic rover is shown after being landed on the Moon's surface by the Artemis lunar landing stage. About the size of a compact car, the Artemis is simple and automated, designed to launch small payloads to the Moon via expendable Earth launch vehicles.

Click here to see a large picture of RECONNOITRER by Pat Rawlings."


TWILIGHT RENDEZVOUS (85K)

by Pat Rawlings

Description: The painting shows a nuclear thermal transfer vehicle preparing to dock with a lunar lander. The transfer vehicle has just passed from sunlight into the shadow of the Moon (illuminated only by reflected light from Earth). Via a sequential building block approach, a Mars transfer rocket/vehicle could be fabricated from parts used by the lunar stage.

Click here to see a large picture of TWILIGHT RENDEZVOUS by Pat Rawlings."


THE LABORATORY (119K)

by Pat Rawlings

Description: The Moon is but a three day rocket journey from Earth. There hardware and operations could be tested for a manned mission to Mars. A modified Mars lander could be tested on a simulated mission using the Moon as the simulated planetary landing site.

Click here to see a large picture of THE LABORATORY by Pat Rawlings."


DESCENT INTO THE CHASM (128K)

by Pat Rawlings

Description: Since Mars has an atmosphere (though thin), parachutes could be used to abruptly slow the first Mars expedition vehicle's descent to the planet's surface. The destination depicted is the floor of Ganges Chasma.

Click here to see a large picture of DESCENT INTO THE CHASM by Pat Rawlings."


LATE FOR CLASS (179K)

by Pat Rawlings

Description: The painting is the artist's conception of how a space university classroom of the future might appear.

Click here to see a large picture of LATE FOR CLASS by Pat Rawlings."


DISTANT SHORES (187K)

by Pat Rawlings

Description: After the Mars astronauts have driven a few miles from their Ganges Chasma landing site on Mars, the pair of Mars explorers pauses to examine a robotic lander and its rover, . The location of the stop is near the original landing site. Here, the crew checks out their life support systems. If difficulties are found, the return to the mother vehicle is but a short walk.

Click here to see a large picture of DISTANT SHORES by Pat Rawlings."


LEAVING EARTH ORBIT (68K)

by Robert McCall

Click here to see a large picture of LEAVING EARTH ORBIT by Robert McCall."


LUNAR BASE MINING (85K)

by Robert McCall

Click here to see a large picture of LUNAR BASE MINING by Robert McCall."


ASTRONAUTS COLLECTING MARTIAN ROCK SAMPLES (85K)

by Robert McCall

Click here to see a large picture of ASTRONAUTS COLLECTING MARTIAN ROCK SAMPLES by Robert McCall."


LUNAR BASE (85K)

by Robert McCall

Click here to see a large picture of LUNAR BASE by Robert McCall."


MARTIAN SCIENCE AND EXPLORATION FACILITIES (102K)

by Robert McCall

Click here to see a large picture of MARTIAN SCIENCE AND EXPLORATION FACILITIES by Robert McCall."


A JOURNEY INTO TOMORROW (58K)

by David A. Hardy

Click here to see a large picture of A JOURNEY INTO TOMORROW by David Hardy."


SPACE COLONY AT LAGRANGIAN POINT L5 (153K)

by Rick Guidice

Subject: The pictures below are an artist's portrayal of a space habitat where 10,000 people work, raise families, and live out normal human lives. Shown is a wheel-like structure in which they live. This structure orbits the Earth in the same orbit as the Moon in a stable position that is equi-distant from both Earth and Moon. This is called the Lagrangian libration point, L5. The habitat consists of a tube 130 m (427 ft) in diametral cross section bent into a wheel 1790 m ( over 1 mi ) in diameter. The people live in the ring-shaped tube which is connected by six large access routes (spokes) to a central hub where incoming spacecraft dock. These spokes are 15 m (48 ft) in diameter and provide entry and exit to the living and agricultural areas in the tubular region. To simulate Earth's normal gravity the entire habitat rotates at one revolution per minute about the central hub.

Much of the interior of the habitat is illuminated with natural sunshine. The Sun's rays in space are deflected by a large stationary mirror suspended directly over the hub. This mirror is inclined at 45 degrees to the axis of rotation and directs the light onto another set of mirrors which, in turn, reflect it into the interior of the habitat's tube through a set of louvered mirrors designed to admit light to the colony while acting as a baffle to stop cosmic radiation. With the help of abundant natural sunshine and controlled agriculture, the colonists are able to raise enough food for themselves on only 63 ha (156 acres). The large paddle-like sturcture below the hub is a radiator by which waste heat is caried away from the habitat.

Abundant solar energy and large amounts of matter from the Moon are keys to successfully establishing a community in space. Not only does the sunshine foster agriculture of unusual productivity, but also it provides energy for industries needed by the colony. Using solar energy to generate electricity and to power solar furnaces the colonists refine aluminum, tatanium, an silicon from lunar ores shippped inexpensively into space. With these materials they are able to manufacture satellite solar power stations and new colonies. The power stations are placed in orbit around the Earth to which they deliver copious and valuable electrical energy. The economic value of these power stations will go far to justify the existence of the colony and the consturction of more colonies.

(The above narrative description is from the source listed below.)
Source: SPACE SETTLEMENTS - A DESIGN STUDY, NASA SP-143, 1977, pg. 1.

Click here to see a large picture of SPACE COLONY AT LAGRANGIAN POINT L5 by Rick Guidice ."


INTERIOR OF THE L5 TORUS SHAPED COLONY (298K)

by Rick Guidice

Click here to see a large picture of INTERIOR OF THE L5 TORUS SHAPED COLONY by Rick Guidice."


A TOUR OF THE L5 SPACE COLONY (281K)

by Rick Guidice

Click here to see a large picture of A TOUR OF THE L5 SPACE COLONY by Rick Guidice."


BUILDING A PROSPEROUS COLONY AT L-5 (145K)

by Rick Guidice

Click here to see a large picture of BUILDING A PROSPEROUS SPACE COLONY AT L5 by Rick Guidice."


VIEW TO THE FUTURE (I) (204K)

by Rick Guidice

Click here to see a large picture of VIEW TO THE FUTURE (I) by Rick Guidice."


VIEW TO THE FUTURE (II) (179K)

by Rick Guidice

Click here to see a large picture of VIEW TO THE FUTURE (II) by Rick Guidice."


INDEX

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Last modified: Tuesday, 30-Nov-04 11:00:00 AM CDT

Author: Jerry Woodfill / NASA, Mail Code ER7, jared.woodfill1@jsc.nasa.gov

Curator: Cecilia Breigh, NASA JSC ER

Responsible Official: Andre Sylvester, NASA JSC ER7

Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division, Walter W. Guy, Chief.

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