SPACE COLORING BOOK HOME PAGE


TITLE PICTURE


Click here for a printable word copy of the space coloring book. Each page is in landscape so that pictures are enlarged. There are 19 separate pages which can be duplexed on a printer so that fewer sheets of paper are used per student.


LIST OF PICTURES

Space Shuttle, Living in Space, Living in Space2, Shuttle Space Suit, Ed White EVA, Johnson Space Center, International Space Station , Careers in Aerospace, Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo, Saturn V Rocket, Galileo to Jupiter, Voyager, Hubble Space Telescope, The Lunar Rover, The National Aerospace Plane, X-15 Tilt Rotor Aircraft, The X-29 Forward-Swept Wing Aircraft


THE SPACE SHUTTLE

SHUTTLE PICTURE

THE SPACE SHUTTLE

The Space Shuttle is a reusable, aerospace vehicle that takes off like a rocket, maneuvers in orbit like a spacecraft, and lands like an airplane. It is launched into Earth orbit to deploy various types of satellites and to conduct experiments in space.

The Shuttle has four major parts: the orbiter, the solid rocket boosters (two), the external tank, and the set of three Space Shuttle main engines in the rear of the orbiter. Only the orbiter and the main engines go into Earth orbit. The other parts are for liftoff and powered flight.

Aboard each Shuttle are experiments which in some way will help everyone here on Earth. These experiments are tested in space; the results are brought back to Earth and applied to our everyday lives.


LIVING IN SPACE

ASTRONAUTS

Living in Space

Astronauts living in space do most of the same things they would do on Earth. They eat, sleep, and attend to personal hygiene everyday, just as we do.

The different forms of the food taken on a shuttle mission are dehydrated (freeze-dried), thermostabilized cans and sealed pouches, intermediate moisture, natural form, and fresh. By adding hot or cold water, the astronauts can prepare and eat foods like chicken, potatoes, and beans. Some foods can be heated in a conventional type oven, one which looks like a suitcase. Foods like nuts, cookies, and canned fruits are ready to eat "as is."

Eating and sleeping in space is different because of weightlessness. The astronauts have to be careful with their food, or it can float away. They have to strap themselves in place while sleeping, or they could float away too.

Astronauts brush their teeth, take sponge baths, and go to the bathroom in space. Waste is placed in a receptacle and brought back to Earth.


LIVING IN SPACE2

GROOM IN SPACE

Living in Space

Astronauts living in space do most of the same things they would do on Earth. They eat, sleep, and attend to personal hygiene everyday, just as we do.

The different forms of the food taken on a shuttle mission are dehydrated (freeze-dried), thermostabilized cans and sealed pouches, intermediate moisture, natural form, and fresh. By adding hot or cold water, the astronauts can prepare and eat foods like chicken, potatoes, and beans. Some foods can be heated in a conventional type oven, one which looks like a suitcase. Foods like nuts, cookies, and canned fruits are ready to eat "as is."

Eating and sleeping in space is different because of "weightlessness." The astronauts have to be careful with their food, or it can float away. They have to strap themselves in place while sleeping, or they could float away, too.

Astronauts brush their teeth, "take sponge baths," and go to the bathroom in space. Waste is placed in a receptacle and brought back to Earth.


SHUTTLE SPACE SUIT

MANNED MANEUVERING UNIT

Shuttle Space Suit

Space suits provide astronauts with air to breathe while working in space. The parts of a space suit are: a helmet, a hard upper torso, flexible lower torso, arm assembly, gloves, and boots. These items are worn to protect the astronauts from hot and cold temperatures. They also help them adjust to the different conditions of space.

Each suit has a Primary Life Support System with an air pack and a communication assembly with a built-in radio. Astronauts working outside the Space Shuttle are always in touch with each other and the crew inside.

The Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) is a one-person, nitrogen-propelled backpack which is attached to the space suit's Primary Life Support System. Using hand controllers, the astronauts can fly around in space to repair and retrieve satellites.


ED WHITE EVA

ED WHITE EVA

First U.S. Space Walk

On June 3-7, 1965 Gemini IV performed a space mission with its commander, James A. McDivitt, and pilot, Edward H. White II. This was the first mission where an American, Ed White, performed an Extra-Vehicle-Activity (EVA or Spacewalk).

Ed White used a self-maneuvering unit which he held in his hand. The unit discharged cold gas. Ed White was tethered to the capsule by an umbilical which provided life support needs like oxygen to breathe.


JOHNSON SPACE CENTER

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER

Johnson Space Center

Each of the NASA centers has unique displays of space program artifacts. The Johnson Space Center features a rocket park displaying boosters used in the Mercury and Apollo Programs.

The Johnson Space Center was established in September 1961 as NASA's primary center for design, development and testing of spacecraft and associated systems for manned flight; selection and training of astronauts; planning and conducting manned missions, and exten-sive participation in the medical engineering and scientitic experiments carried aboard space flights.

Johnson has program management responsi-bility for the Space Shuttle program, the nation's current manned space flight program. Johnson also has a major responsibility for the development of the Space Station, a permanently manned, Earth-orbiting facility to be constructed in space and operable within a decade. The center will be responsible for the interfaces between the Space Station and the Space Shuttle.


INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION

INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION

International Space Station

NASA is making plans to build the International Space Station, a permanent base in space where astronauts and scientists will live and work. Several European countries, Canada, and Japan are participating with us in the space station project. Freedom's crew will perform experiments in the microgravity of space, experiments that cannot be done on Earth. Scientists want to know what happens to people who live in space for a long time. They also want to study how nonliving things, like crystals, metals, fluids, and other materials behave in space. They will study Earth, our solar system, and the stars from the International Space Station, too. Space tugs for roundtrip missions to a future lunar base, and large spaceships that will carry human explorers to Mars, could be put together and launched from the International Space Station.

NASA is building the International Space Station to help make life better for all Americans and for our friends.


CAREERS IN AEROSPACE

SPACE CAREERS

Careers in Aerospace

Have you started thinking about what you would like to do when you grow up? There will be a continued demand for aerospace scientists, engineers, technologists, and technicians. The choices you make in school could affect your career possibilities.

People who study numbers and the relationship between numbers are called mathematicians; engineers are problem solvers; scientists study how the universe works; and astronauts explore and conduct research in space.

Teamwork is an important part of the lives of all NASA personnel. A mathematician, engineer, scientist, and astronaut all depend on each other's skill and knowledge to get the job done.

SPACE CAREERS


MERCURY, GEMINI, AND APOLLO

MANNED SPACECRAFT

Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo

The Mercury spacecraft carried the first Americans into space in 1961, 1962, and 1963. Six Mercury astronauts flew into space aboard these cramped, one-person capsules for missions ranging from 15 minutes to 34 hours at a time.

The Gemini spacecraft, an enlarged version of Mercury, carried two persons into Earth orbit. In Gemini, astronauts practiced many of the things that would be necessary for future Apollo missions to the Moon. During ten manned Gemini missions, Americans walked in space for the first time, docked their capsules with other vehicles, and spent up to two weeks in orbit.

The 12-foot by 12-foot, cone-shaped Apollo Command Module was designed to house three American astronauts at a time on their trips to and from the Moon. A four-legged companion spacecraft, called the Lunar Module, was used to actually land two astronauts on the lunar surface and return them back to their mother ship. The third astronaut stayed behind in orbit around the Moon. The first manned lunar landing took place on July 20, 1969.


THE SATURN V ROCKET

SATURN ROCKET

Saturn V

The NASA developed Saturn V three-stage launch vehicle took men to the moon. Its first stage (S-IC, by Boeing) was 138 feet by 33 feet with RP-1 and LOX propellants for 7.76 million pounds of thrust; its second stage (S-II, by Rockwell) was 81.5 feet by 33 feet with LH2 and LOX propellants producing 1.15 million pounds of thrust; and its third stage (S-IVB, by McDonnell Douglas) was 59.3 feet by 21.7 feet with propellants LH2 and LOX producing 230,000 pounds of thrust. With adapter, Apollo spacecraft, and launch escape system, Saturn V stood 363 feet high.


Galileo to Jupiter

GALILEO

Galileo

The Galileo spacecraft was launched towards Jupiter by the Space Shuttle. It will take nearly six years for Galileo to make the long trip to the largest planet in our solar system.

Once it arrives at Jupiter in 1995, Galileo will send a probe into the huge planet's atmosphere to measure the winds and clouds. The probe will last 75 minutes until it is crushed by the tremendous pressure of Jupiter's atmosphere. Although the probe will be gone, the Galileo spacecraft will remain, going into a permanent orbit around Jupiter.

From its orbit, Galileo will give us continuous views of Jupiter and its great red spot, a tor-nado which is larger than three Earths and which has been raging over 300 years. It will also make close fly-bys of the major moons of Jupiter.


VOYAGER

VOYAGER

Voyager

Two spacecraft, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2, were launched in 1977 to examine the outer giant gas planets. The spacecraft explored Jupiter's great red spot, Saturn's elegant rings, Uranus' sideways rotation, and Neptune's crazy, backward orbiting moon, Triton.

Both Voyagers provided us with the first close view of the outer planets and helped us to discover many new things. Because the planets are very different from Earth, the photographs taken by these spacecraft have helped us to understand the solar system and the differences between the inner and outer planets.


THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

HUBBLE

The Hubble Space Telescope

The Hubble Space Telescope will go into space aboard the Shuttle. It will be a huge "eye in the sky" to help us study the heavens.

Above Earth's hazy atmosphere, this space telescope will see planets and stars more clearly. Scientists will be able to see seven times farther into space than ever before.

The Hubble Space Telescope is made up of the telescope, instruments which relay what it sees to people on the ground, and wing-like solar panels which turn the Sun's rays into electrical power to run the telescope.


THE LUNAR ROVER

LUNAR ROVER

Lunar Rover Vehicle

The Lunar Rover Vehicle was a space buggy. The astronauts used it to explore their landing sites on the Moon. They gathered Moon rocks and soil, and traveled much farther than they could have on foot. During Apollo 17, the rover traveled 12 miles on one of its three trips.

It was neatly folded up inside the lunar lander during trips to the Moon, but once on the Moon's surface, it unfolded with the help of springs. The Apollo 15, 16, and 17 missions made use of the lunar car.

Because the Moon's surface is rugged, the buggy was designed to climb steep slopes, to go over rocks, and to move easily over the sand-like surface. It was able to carry more than twice its own weight in passengers, scientific instruments, and soil samples.


THE NATIONAL AEROSPACE PLANE

AEROSPACE PLANE

National Aerospace Plane

Imagine a sleek research plane that takes off like an airliner from a regular airport runway, then lights up its powerful "scramjet" engines to roar into orbit around Earth. The National Aerospace Plane Program, conducted by NASA and the Department of Defense, may make that dream a reality. Scientists and engineers are hard at work studying and developing the tech-nology needed for this revolutionary aerospace vehicle. If all goes well, the decision to build an experimental version called "X-30" could come as early as 1993.

In the 21st century, the technology from the National Aerospace Plane project may pro-duce spaceliners that would give America economical and easy access to orbit, and airliners that could fly high in the atmosphere at nearly 8,000 miles per hour.


THE X-15 TILT ROTOR AIRCRAFT

X-15 TILT ROTOR AIRCRAFT

XV-15 Tilt-Rotor

NASA's remarkable XV-15 Tilt-Rotor combines the best of both helicopters and airplanes in one vehicle. Using powerful engines mounted at the end of each wing, the XV-15 can take off and land vertically. When the pilot wishes to fly straight ahead, she/he simply tilts the engines to a horizontal position in just 12 seconds and zooms away.

Because they would require little runway space and would be relatively quiet, future aircraft based on the XV-15 might be especially useful to relieve congestion at major city airports.


THE X-29 FORWARD-SWEPT WING AIRCRAFT

X-29 AIRCRAFT

X-29 Aircraft

With its forward-swept wings and small "canards" mounted in back of the cockpit, the X-29 research aircraft may be the oddest looking "X-Plane" ever. But there's a purpose to its strange appearance. Engineers have found that angling the wings forward instead of back makes the X-29 much more maneuverable than other aircraft with traditional swept-back wings. To keep the X-29 in the air, however, sensitive electronic computers must check and adjust the control surfaces 40 times a second.


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Last modified: Wednesday, 23-May-2012 03:30:00 PM CDT

Author: Jerry Woodfill / NASA, Mail Code ER7, jared.woodfill1@jsc.nasa.gov

Curator: Cecilia Breigh, NASA JSC ER

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